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Top Cancers in Men

Prostate Cancer

The prostate is a gland that assists with reproduction, but as you age, it increases in size and can lead to complications such as BPH and prostate cancer.

Prostate cancer is #1 on that list of common cancers in men. According to the most recent figures, in 2014 233,000 men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer, which is about 27% of all cancer diagnoses. In fact about 1 in 6 men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer in their lifetime. The average age for this diagnosis is between the ages of 65-69 and that accounts for 65% of all diagnoses.

What can you do?

There are two tests you can get – the PSA and DRE. Getting screened isn’t necessarily a guarantee you can get diagnosed and treated, but it can help if your urologist thinks you make be at risk for prostate cancer. Talk to your urologist if you think you should be screened.

Bladder Cancer

Bladder cancer is #4 on the list of the most common cancers in men. It’s estimated that about 56,000 men will be diagnosed with bladder cancer. Unlike prostate cancer which tends to be more genetically caused, bladder cancer is preventable. However if not treated early, bladder cancer can spread to lymph nodes of the pelvis, abdomen or even the neck.

What can you do?

While risk of bladder cancer can increase from family history and other genetic factors, age and smoking are the two biggest risk factors. Most men diagnosed are over the age of 70, but smoking can increase your risk at any age. Quitting smoking can help significantly reduce your chances of getting bladder cancer (and lung cancer, which is #2 on the most common cancers in men list)

Kidney Cancer

Also known as renal cancer, kidney cancer, a is #6 on the list. About 39,000 cases of kidney cancer are expected to be diagnosed in men. Most cases of kidney cancer first appear in the lining of small tubes in the kidney called tubules. Luckily, most of the time this is found before it spreads. Most men diagnosed are 60 or older.

What can you do?

Two big risk factors for kidney cancer are smoking and obesity. If you quit smoking and try to live a healthier lifestyle (being more active, eating more rich fruits and vegetables and less fatty meats) you greatly reduce your chances of getting kidney cancer.